The Hotness Axiom
I am so so sorry.

LOL, Ariel, this movie sucks so hard but I’m too high to care! David Lyons still looks pretty and he’s in uniform!

I got high and started watching Safe Haven.  Don’t try this at home, kids.

David Lyons is supposed to be the bad guy, I think, but all I can think about is cop!Bass in some demented Revolution AU.


"It is okay, Buck."

"It is okay, Buck."

Yuletide Nomination Discussions

schreberpants:

Thinking of Signing up for Yuletide?

Fandom Nominations for yuletidetreasure are limited to 3 fandoms and 4 characters in each this year (even though you can request 4 fandoms and write basically as many as you want) so there’s some discussion going on on Livejournal to help coordinate fandom nominations and nominations of large-cast fandoms. If you’re interested in participating in the best small-fandom fic exchange on the internet, you might want to come collaborate.

Direct links to discussions for fandoms you may care about:
Syfy’s Defiance
Penny Dreadful
Lost Boys
24
The M Machine’s Metropolis
(I will definitely also be nominating Dark City and Flatliners and have two open character slots if anyone wants more characters in those fandoms.)

What is this glorious thing called Yuletide?

Please reblog for anyone who might be part of these fandoms or interested in participating. :)

I can’t believe it’s already that time of the year!  I think I’ll also be asking for Sebastian Stan porn from Political Animals and Kings.  timidtimbuktu, you should sign up this year!

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

satincas:

FOREVER PLACE || DCBB 2014

In the face of Cas’ vanishing act into the depths of a Leviathan-laden reservoir and the countless Leviathan spirits free in the water system of the northern United States, Sam convinces a guilt-ridden Dean to come with him on a recovery case in Savannah, Georgia. The slow relaxation of a hot southern summer changes something imperceptibly in both of them and something makes them want to stay, even after the case is done. In the wake of this change, Dean meets a cashier at a local barbecue hut. He goes by James, but Dean knows him as something else: Castiel. A Castiel without memories, who quickly falls for the mysterious man with green eyes who frequents his work under the guise of loving barbecue (and peaches). They fall in love, slow like summer, under the hanging Spanish moss of an abandoned plantation that has fallen under the spell of Cas’ latent grace.

a season 7 canon-divergent au that explores what would have happened if cas had perhaps made his own way out of the river.

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